Let Us not Punish an American President by Denying Him the Hate He has Worked so Hard to Earn

Let Us not Punish an American President by Denying Him the Hate He has Worked so Hard to Earn

By Peter Kremidas

Civility is important when discussing modern political issues. With the divisions that exist between those who are against child torture and those who encourage it, it’s important to speak persuasively.

The cynical among you might say that these people have been immune to data for decades, and that studies show that they largely tend to only check right wing media assertions against other right wing media while the rest of the country checks against a variety of sources, to the point where they don’t believe climate change is real. “How,” you may ask “can you have a debate when you don’t even have a shared reality?” You could point out that the differences in reality you assert are not matters of perspective. You might even point out that we have watched literally all their ideas fail over and over again or that there is no middle ground on whether or not climate change exists or if we should or should not torture children.

I bet there’s someone among you thinking “Gee, Pete. Don’t forget that they routinely cheat to get what they want and the other side doesn’t.”

And that’s all well and good but shut up for a second.

It is not important to tell the truth. 

It is important to be nice.

Sometimes, when you are negotiating with someone whose position is that you must be destroyed, you might find it hard to find that elusive common ground required in a functioning democracy. Even if that common ground is just you giving up things while they don’t. Or if one side has absolutely no interest in being a functioning democracy. When you find yourself in that position, remember, you will catch more flies with honey than with vinegar. It is especially important to remember this while they are attracting their own flies with shit, which is illegal, and then feeding it to them.

Let’s imagine some far off ridiculous scenario where there are thousands of starving children, we’re responsible for them, and we need to act quickly. Let us also imagine that, in this scenario, one side of the negotiation table is demanding more money to build more places to keep kids, and refuses to guarantee their safety or better treatment. The answer, which turns out was given to us in real life by Nancy Pelosi last week, is to get the Vice President’s assurances verbally that no more kids will be harmed. 

It is not important to remember that the White House has said out loud that they think their treatment of the children is an effective deterrent, and a price worth paying if it means less people will flee their war torn home countries and ask us for help.

It is important to be nice.

Even if one person with a knife can kill an entire city of nice people.

Notes from the Post-it Wall | Week of July 7, 2019

Notes from the Post-it Wall | Week of July 7, 2019

Wounds,—a new cure for.—

Wounds,—a new cure for.—