I Believe... [Will SOME Mega-Corporations PLEASE Regulate the Internet?]

I Believe... [Will SOME Mega-Corporations PLEASE Regulate the Internet?]

By Don Hall

...that the only difference between one critic inserting her political opinion about the sociopolitical landscape within the themes of a play and another inserting her political opinion concerning allegations made against the director in reviews of the plays is political ideology. The double-standard involved in evaluating journalistic integrity is thick and wide.

...that there is a paradox afoot when we are trying hard to get a few mega-corporations to regulate content on the internet (Faceborg, Google) and trying hard to prevent other mega-corporations from regulating content on the internet (Comcast, ATT&T) at the same time.

...that, while a brilliant comedy horror film with sociopolitical allegories galore, Get Out is no more a documentary than Soylent Green, The Stepford Wives, or Invasion of the Body Snatchers.

...that there is nothing but irony, dripping from the knife's edge, to consider that we are mostly just angry at Donald Trump not because he has actually done anything damaging to the country (like actually start building his fucking wall or actually starting a war) but because he's an asshole. This irony says more about us and our preoccupation with the trappings of high school dramatics than it does about Trump.

...that if you are looking for insult, you'll find it despite any attempt to insult you. Insult (which today is casually equated to injury) is like innuendo—it's there if that's what you want to see. For example, if I say "Welp! Time to go play a round of Yahtzee!" it could mean I'm going to spank my man-weasel, go drop a deuce or maybe just go play a board game. What you want to see, divorced of my intent, is what you see.

 Maybe the board game is all sexed up and stuff?

Maybe the board game is all sexed up and stuff?

A Death in the Dining Room

A Death in the Dining Room

Let's Talk About Teacher Burnout: It's Not the Kids

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